Plastic components replaced metal to reduce weight and increase the efficiency of the motorcycle

When the leading British motorcycle manufacturer needed to reduce the weight of its motorcycles to increase efficiency – it challenged Tex Plastics engineering team to replace as many metal parts with plastic using the most relevant super high-grade, high-performance technical polymers as they could.

24th February 2017

Could plastic really out-perform aluminum or steel parts?

Replacing metal, specifically aluminum or steel parts, with plastic meant strength, heat and performance needed to be factored in. The lifespan of the product within this premium British brand, meant testing and durability trials were essential. Thankfully the team at Tex Plastics are all well versed in the range of technical polymers capable of replacing metal, whilst matching or exceeding the specific components physical, aesthetic and performance requirements.

The savings were more than efficiency – there were real cost benefits too

This change in thinking enabled the manufacturer to move away from the traditional ways of using high value aluminum panels and using “super high-grade, high-performance technical polymer” components in multiple areas. Replacing metal with plastic means matching the physical qualities of strength, durability, heat resistance – and at the same time providing the aesthetic qualities a market leading luxury brand with global sales demands.

Replacing metal with plastic also meant aftermarket stocks and sales were a surprise benefit

Plastic injection moulded components in a technical polymer are so much less expensive per unit, compared to cast aluminum. Which means now that if an item gets damaged it can be easily replaced, because investment in aftermarket stock is less, so it’s readily available. Plus, replacement is now more cost effective for the motorcycle owner than repairing or replacing a metal component.

Find out how we can help you drive waste out of your plastics injection moulded parts and associated supply chain